H-1B Visa: Essential Requirements When Applying For One

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Hiring a diverse workforce might be the best thing for your business. It gives your firm the chance to understand different cultures and expand your global reach. One of the efficient ways for companies in the U.S. to achieve diversity in the workplace is by using an H-1B visa.

TheH-1B visa program allows Utah employers to sponsor foreigners to work for them. There are several requirements for a successful H-1B visa application. Here are some of these requirements.

Academic Qualifications

For an employee to get an H-1B visa, he/she should have completed a U.S. equivalent four-year bachelor or higher degree in an accredited institution. If he/she has a foreign degree completed within three years, this is still acceptable though it falls one year short of the required. To qualify for a three-year degree, the employee must have a minimum of three years work experience in a relevant field as this might be considered equal to the one-year education.

Occupation

Only workers in specialty occupations are eligible for H-1B visas. Specialty occupations refer to those which require a practical application and theoretical knowledge of highly specialized expertise to carry out. These include sectors like finance, medicine, technology, engineering and law among others.

USCIS and DOL Obligations

One of the critical requirements for an employer to petition a foreign worker is that the company should be a U.S. employer. This means your firm should have a tax identification number from the IRS. You must also file an LCA {labor condition application} detailing the expected wage, company profile and employment terms in the same geographical area as the job location before filing the H-1B petition form I-129.

There are only a total of 65,000 H-1B visas up for grabs annually. Every company irrespective of its size can only petition for one visa. You should hence get an immigration expert to help you in your venture to place your petition above your competitors’.